TRADITIONAL DANCES OF GOA

 
   
Bhonvaddo

Bhonvaddo

This dance is a ritualistic dance which is usually held during the feast of the deity "Lairai" in Shirgao. The folk artists begin by encircling the temple. As they do so, the beat the "dhols", a percussion instrument.

It may looks easy but it requires a lot of practice. (Click Here for more Information on Bhonvaddo)

 
Dhalo

Dhalo

There are two main festivals in Goa: Dhalo and Shigmo. Dhalo is a festival dedicated to and danced by women. The beauty of the dance is in the simplicity of the steps. The mock killing of an animal as an offering to the Gods is one of the highlights of the Dhalo danced by the Hindu women. Men are absent even though the scene portrayed is a hunting scene. (Click Here for more Information on Dhalo )

Khell Tiatr

Khell Tiatr

The traditional forms of entertainment in Goa were "Zagors" and "Khells". The "khell tiatr" were very popular forms of drama in South Goa. Today they are still performed especially during Carnival but also in other occasions like Christmas and Easter. 

The major difference from other traditional forms of entertainment, is that the musical instruments are all western and were always connected to the Christian community.  (Click Here for more Information on Khell Tiatr)

Chappay

Chappay

"Chappay" or "Harballo" is a dance performed only by the Dhangar community during Dussera. 

The Dhangars are known for their occupation of cattle rearing and can be found concentrated in many parts of Sattari. Their dance is very much connected to their lifestyle specially the women whose dance is known as Zemado.

The steps in Zemado depict the movements of goats. It is a very slow dance accompanied by the chanting of the women. This chanting give us the impression of being in the midst of a serene field dotted by goats. (Click here for more information on Chappay / Zemudo)

Fugdi

Fugdi

Fugdi is a dance performed by the Hindu, Christian and tribal communities during the Dhalo festival. Amongst traditional dances this is one that does not need any musical instruments.

By rhythmic clapping and singing, our hard working rual women created a dance that portrays their days of toil in the fields and their daily life.

One interesting fact is that in Fugdi, women always dance in a circle whether the dance is performed by Hindus, Christians or tribals but there are other interesting differences that will meet the eye.  (Click here for more information on Chappay / Zemudo)

Ghodemodni

Ghodemodni

Ghodemodni is a warrior dance where legends of bravery are reenacted. Like any other dances, it is performed during the Hindu festival of Shigmo.

Mock depictions of horse bound warriors ready to take on the enemy and the high energy levels, make this dance an outstanding portrayal of a battle scene in our glorious past. (Click here for more information on Ghodemodni)

Goff

Goff

Goff is another example of a dance performed during Shigmo festival - a festival exclusively danced by men.

A "matov", or temporary roof, is erected with a bundle of six to twelve ropes suspended from it. The dancer holds a napkin while the left hand holds a rope which hangs from the suspended canopy.

While dancing, there is no room for mistakes as it could result in the rope weaving going "topsy turvy".
The formations done with these ropes, apart from its beauty, hide a deep meaning about indian society. (Click here for more information on Goff)

Kaalo

Kaalo

Like "Zagor" and "Khell Tiatr", there is a mixture of theatre and dance which makes of "Kaalo" one of the most interesting forms of entertainment.

Kaalo is a theatre form based on the ten incarnations of lord Vishnu and one of its characters is lord Ganesh. These characters intermingle and converse with the audience which makes this performance even more interesting. (Click here for more information on Kaalo)

Mando

Mando

Mando is one of the few dances of Christian origin. The "Torhop baz" (costume) shown here was worn only by the upper caste (Catholic Brahmins). It is here that the rare fusion of violin (western) with the "ghumot" (indian percussion) fist made an appearance.

It was the only dance reserved for the elite upper caste. However today the various mando competitions have propagated this dance form amongst all goans irrespective of caste. (Click here for more information on Mando)

Morulo

Morulo

The national bird of India, has this dance dedicated to it.

Sarwan, where this peacock dance was recorded, is of special significance, even though this dance is performed in many other talukas of Goa. (Click here for more information on Morulo)

Tonya Mell

Tonya Mell

The etymology of the name of the folk dance "Tonya Mell" comes from two words: "tonyo" or "toni" which means a stick and "mell", which means a collection of dancers. Although this dance is a popular dance form of the Kulmi community, members from other communities take part in it.

Like "Tonya Mell", "Taalgadi" can also be broken into two parts: "Taal" means rhythm while "gadi" means man.

The common factor between these two dances is the dress code: tight dhoti and a turban decorated with flowers. Most of the time, these flowers are the locally "aboli". Three branches are attached to the headgear.

As the music played the dancers form a circle and dance all along waving a colorful cloth. various actions are mimed such as the wearing of a blouse, an anklet and playing the flute etc. With time, many more such activities have been choreographed and assimilated into the dance by the dancers. (Click here for more information on Tonya Mell )

Zagor

Zagor

"Zagor" is pure entertainment. A tradition shared both by the Hindus and Catholics, is an informal mix of dance and theatre.

Depiction of everyday life, spoofs on current events and personalities, humorous takes on characters such as the village eve teaser or the rude government official can be seen in "Zagor".

Since women are not allowed to participate; men play the female role too. The hilarious scene about the temple priest is something you do not want to miss. (Click here for more information on Zagor)

 

 
   
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